FREE PRINTABLE||Pregnancy and Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is something that some women are diagnosed with during pregnancy that goes away once the baby is born. Usually between the 26th and 28th week of pregnancy your doctor will want you to do a glucose test. Some physicians will allow you to skip the test and do other things as an alternative, this is something you would need to discuss with them.

The glucose test will evaluate the way your body processes sugars, you will be asked to drink a sugary drink and then your blood will be drawn usually an hour later. If you fail that test you may be asked to come back for a 3 hours test, you will then have your blood drawn every hour for three hours. If your sugars are still high this will let your physician know that you have gestational diabetes. 

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes happens to women who have never had diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association it is not known what causes gestational diabetes. They do believe it has to do with the hormones from the placenta blocking the action of the insulin in the mothers body. Without enough insulin glucose cannot leave the blood and be turned into energy, in turn resulting in high levels of glucose.

Depending on the severity of the gestational diabetes you might be able to control it with diet and exercise, if not your physician may put you on medication to help control your sugars, even then you will need to watch what you eat. Your doctor will most likely have you meet with a dietitian who will go over the amount of carbohydrates you should consume daily. To make things easy we have created a printable low carb shopping list for you that you can get here.

There are many resources out there for you to learn more about gestational diabetes. Remember that It's important to control your gestational diabetes, if you do not you could be causing harm to your baby and this is something that your physician will go over with you.

Wishing you a healthy pregnancy,

Amanda

Source: http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/ge...